A Northern Kentucky student was among those killed in a Halloween crowd in South Korea

A Northern Kentucky woman who was a nursing student at the University of Kentucky was among those killed in a massive Halloween party stampede in South Korea after a traditional Halloween party in Seoul, South Korea. Keeske is a junior nursing student from Fort Mitchell, Kentucky, who studied abroad this semester in South Korea. He will graduate in 2021 from Beachwood High School, where he is a key member of the marching band, said Beachwood High School Principal Justin Kaiser. Gieske spent the summer volunteering with the Marching Tigers, working closely with current drum majors and clarinets. According to his social media, Gieske celebrated his 20th birthday two days ago. “We are completely devastated by the loss of Anne Marie. She was a bright light loved by all. We ask for your prayers, but we also ask for the respect of our privacy. Anne’s final gift to us was dying in a state of sanctifying grace. We know we will be reunited with her one day in God’s Kingdom. ,” his father Dan said in a statement. Fort Mitchell Mayor Jude Hehman and the City Council released a statement following the news. “Our heartfelt thoughts and prayers go out to the Kieske and Klein families who have such deep roots in our Fort Mitchell community.” Those killed or injured were mostly teenagers and under the age of 20, according to Choi Seong-beom, chief of Seoul’s Yongsan Fire Department. The death toll may rise further. 19 of the injured are in critical condition.100,000 people gathered in Itaewon for the country’s largest outdoor Halloween festivities since the outbreak began and strict rules were enforced on gatherings. The South Korean government has eased COVID-19 restrictions in recent months. For many young people, this is their first big chance to go out and party. Halloween has become a major attraction for young South Koreans over the years. “We have two more students and a teacher who are also members this semester. They have been contacted and are safe,” Cabiluto said in a statement. Cabiluto said he has been in contact with the school. We have reached out to Keeske to offer support. “We will be there for those in our community who knew and loved Anne. . . We also have almost 80 students from South Korea in the UK – from our community – who will need our support,” Capiluto said in a statement. The stampede was the country’s worst disaster in years.

A Northern Kentucky woman who was a nursing student at the University of Kentucky was among those killed in a massive Halloween party stampede in South Korea.

University President Eli Capilodo first announced on Sunday Ann Kieske, a student, was among more than 150 killed in a stampede at a traditional Halloween gathering in Seoul, South Korea.

Kieske is a junior nursing student from Fort Mitchell, Kentucky, who was studying in South Korea this semester with a study abroad program.

He graduated from Beachwood High School in 2021, where he was a key member of the marching band, Beachwood High School Principal Justin Kaiser said.

Gieske spent the summer volunteering with the Marching Tigers, working closely with current drum majors and clarinets. According to his social media, Kieske celebrated his 20th birthday two days ago.

“We are completely devastated by the loss of Anne Marie. She was a bright light loved by all. We ask for your prayers, but we also ask for the respect of our privacy. Anne’s final gift to us was dying in sanctifying grace. We know that one day we will be reunited with her in the Kingdom of God.” His father Dan said in a statement.

Fort Mitchell Mayor Jude Hehman and the City Council issued a statement following the news.

“Our heartfelt thoughts and prayers go out to the Kieske and Klein families who have such deep roots in our Fort Mitchell community.”

According to Choi Seong-beom, chief of Seoul’s Yongsan Fire Department, those killed or injured were mostly teenagers and under 20 years old. The death toll may rise further as 19 of the injured are in critical condition.

100,000 people gathered in Itaewon for the country’s biggest outdoor Halloween festivities since the pandemic began and strict rules were enforced on gatherings. The South Korean government has eased COVID-19 restrictions in recent months, giving many young people their first big chance to go out and party. Halloween has become a major attraction for young South Koreans over the years.

“We still have two students and one faculty member this semester. They have been contacted and are safe,” Cabiluto said in a statement.

Cabiluto said, “We have reached out to Ziske to offer support to the school.

“We will be there for those in our community who knew and loved Anne. We have almost 80 students from South Korea in the UK – from our community – who will need our support,” Capiludo said in a statement.

Congestion is the worst disaster in the country.

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