Artemis 1 release scrubbed

The latest: NASA Administrator Bill Nelson, Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems Development Jim Free and Artemis Mission Manager Mike Sarafin addressed the Artemis 1 launch scrub on Saturday at 4 p.m. “We won’t launch until we think it’s right,” Nelson said. . “Our teams have worked on that, and that’s the conclusion they’ve come to… safety is at the top of the list.” The free release doesn’t come on Monday or Tuesday, but should be late September or late October. . “We don’t go easy on these tests,” Frei said, due to conflicts with SpaceX Crew 5 in late September. “We hope to arrive today, but we’re not going to start until we’re ready.” Sarafin said the large hydrogen leak occurred when the crew went from a “slow fill” to a “fast fill.” He said teams tried three times to fix the leak but were unsuccessful. He said the volume of the leak created a fire hazard and hydrogen was volatile. Engineers discussed several options, Sarafin said, but none allowed for launch before the Sept. 6 launch deadline. The rocket had to be rolled back to the VAB because the batteries needed to be replaced. Nelson said this currently poses no risk to the timeline for future Artemis missions: Artemis II is still scheduled for 2024 and Artemis III is still scheduled for 2025. “Two scrubs cost a lot less than failure,” Nelson said. WATCH BELOW: NASA update following Saturday’s Artemis 1 scrub PREVIOUS STORY BELOW: Artemis 1’s second launch attempt from Kennedy Space Center on Saturday unfortunately failed. According to NASA, a hydrogen leak was detected on the supply side of the 8-inch quick disconnect while attempting to transfer fuel to the rocket. A hydrogen leak was discovered around 7 a.m. and various tactics were tried to fix the problem. Launch director Charlie Blackwell-Thompson and his team tried to stop the leak Saturday by stopping and restarting the flow of super-cold liquid hydrogen in hopes of clearing the gap around the seal in the supply line. They tried it twice, actually, and purged the helium through the line. But the leak persisted. Ultimately, engineers told officials their recommendation that the launch be scrapped. Blackwell-Thompson finally stopped the countdown after three to four hours of futile effort, and at 11:15 a.m. NASA Administrator Bill Nelson told the launch, “When it’s ready, we’ll go. We’re not going to go on a test flight until then and especially now because we’re going to stress test it and test that heat shield and make sure it’s right before we put four people on top of it. ” added the administrator. Part of the space program. NASA rockets are complex vehicles, but especially with SLS, all those systems are working together for the first time. One of the problems that surfaced in Monday’s launch was a hydrogen leak. “When you’re using liquid hydrogen as your propellant, your fuel. Hydrogen is your smallest molecule, two hydrogen atoms and a tiny molecule that leaks out very easily through tiny cracks,” said Phil Metzger of the Space Institute at UCF, Florida. SLS will have to deal with even more hydrogen leaks. . Another issue that halted Monday’s launch was a sensor reading that said the engine wasn’t cool enough. Uncertainty on Monday, but we’ve made sure we have a good run with those engines. We know we can cool those engines. We are ready to go that route. We’ve done the analysis and the teams are ready to support Saturday’s launch attempts,” John Blevins, the Space Launch Agency’s chief engineer, had said earlier in the week. When the launch takes place, the rocket will orbit the moon without astronauts. Before returning to Earth. The flight paves the way for future launches that will send astronauts to the Moon and beyond.

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NASA Administrator Bill Nelson, Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems Development Jim Frei and Artemis Mission Manager Mike Sarafin addressed the Artemis 1 launch scrub at 4 p.m. Saturday.

“We don’t start until we think it’s right,” Nelson said. “Our teams have worked on this and that [scrubbing] That’s the conclusion they came to…security is top of the list.”

The free release won’t come on Monday or Tuesday, but should be late September or later in October. Due to conflicts with SpaceX Crew 5, chances for late September are slim.

“We’re not going easy on these trials,” Frei said. “We hope to arrive today, but we’re not going to start until we’re ready.”

Sarafin said the large hydrogen leak occurred when crews went from “slow fill” to “fast fill.”

He said teams tried three times to fix the leak but were unsuccessful. He said the volume of the leak created a flammability hazard and the hydrogen was volatile.

Sarafin said engineers had discussed several options, but none would have approved a launch before the September 6 launch deadline.

Officials confirmed that the rocket had to be rolled back to the VAB as the batteries needed to be replaced.

Nelson said this currently poses no risk to the timeline for future Artemis missions: Artemis II is still scheduled for 2024 and Artemis III is still scheduled for 2025.

“Two scrubs cost a lot less than failure,” Nelson said.

Watch below: NASA update following Saturday’s Artemis 1 scrub

Previous story below:

Artemis 1’s second launch attempt from the Kennedy Space Center on Saturday unfortunately failed.

According to NASA, a hydrogen leak was detected on the supply side of the 8-inch quick disconnect while attempting to transfer fuel to the rocket.

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A hydrogen leak was discovered around 7 a.m. and various tactics were tried to fix the problem.

Launch director Charlie Blackwell-Thompson and his team tried to contain the leak Saturday by stopping and restarting the flow of super-cold liquid hydrogen in hopes of clearing the gap around the seal in the supply line. They tried it twice, actually, and purged the helium through the line. But the leak persisted.

Ultimately, engineers told officials their recommendation that the launch be scrapped. Blackwell-Thompson finally stopped the countdown at 11:15 a.m. after three to four hours of futile efforts.

NASA Administrator Bill Nelson, on hand for the launch, said, “When it’s ready, we’ll go. We’re not going to go on a test flight until then and especially now because we’re going to stress test it and test that heat shield and make sure it’s right before we put four people on top of it.

The executive added that the scrubs are part of the space program. NASA rockets are complex vehicles, but especially with SLS all those systems work together for the first time.

One of the problems with Monday’s launch attempt was a hydrogen leak.

“When you use liquid hydrogen as your propellant, as your fuel, the hydrogen leaks very easily through your smallest molecule, two hydrogen atoms and tiny cracks in the molecule,” said Bill Metzger of the Space Institute at UCF, Florida.

So as we move forward with Artemis launch efforts, NASA engineers will have to deal with even more hydrogen leaks aboard SLS.

Another issue that halted Monday’s launch was a sensor reading that indicated the engine was not cool enough.

“We had some sensors and we thought, what do we do, and on Monday we stood in that uncertainty and did the right thing, but we’ve confirmed that there’s good flow through those engines. We know we can cool those engines. We’re ready to go that way. We’ve analyzed, Crews are ready to support launch efforts on Saturday,” Space Launch System chief engineer John Blevins had said earlier in the week.

When the launch occurs, the rocket will be launched without astronauts and will circle the moon before landing on Earth. The flight paves the way for future launches that will send astronauts to the Moon and beyond.

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